Military Dogs: From Warrior to Specialist

•January 26, 2015 • Leave a Comment

War Dog Photo Album

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jorge Davila and his military working dog Kibo at a traffic control point in Tikrit, Iraq in 2006. Photo by U.S. Army Spc. Teddy Wade.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jorge Davila and working dog Kibo at a traffic control point in Tikrit, Iraq in 2006 while attached to the 101st Airborne Division. Photo by U.S. Army Spc. Teddy Wade.

Throughout history, dogs have been used as front-line attackers, scouts, sentries, trackers, messengers, unit mascots, and much more. Whereas some were once bred for fighting – the now extinct Molossus dog may have been specifically trained for battle – modern weapons have relegated canines to support roles where their keen senses can assist accompanying troops.

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Destroying Fort Schmerzen: Freeing The Prisoners

•January 12, 2015 • Leave a Comment

Mission Photo Album

The captain of Lt. Mike Powell's Ranger squad kills a German guard as the boxcar doors open inside Fort Schmerzen.

The captain of Lt. Mike Powell’s Ranger squad kills a German guard as the boxcar doors open inside Fort Schmerzen before the soldiers begin their assault on the fictional fort.

The “Schmerzen Express” grinds to a halt inside the fort’s gates, a Trojan Horse with boxcars full of U.S. Army Rangers ready to ambush the unsuspecting German soldiers outside. The doors open and Lt. Mike Powell and his squad engage enemy snipers in towers overlooking the tracks in a deadly firefight.

Once the train platform is clear, Powell makes his way inside to free some Allied prisoners held in cells on Fort Schmerzen‘s top floor before heading deeper into the facility to plant his explosives.

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Destroying Fort Schmerzen: The Schmerzen Express

•January 5, 2015 • Leave a Comment

Mission Photo Album

The last train station before Fort Schmerzen, with one of its many guard towers in the foreground.

The last train station before Fort Schmerzen with one of its many guard towers.

Having blacked out communications in the area, Lt. Mike Powell sneaks through a snow-blanketed public park as German alarms fade into the distance.

He’s on his way to fictional Fort Schmerzen, which he’ll destroy with help from a team of U.S. Army Rangers he’s meeting at a nearby train station. While the soldiers in the park offer little resistance, the station is better-defended.

Powell’s objective: cut power to the electrified perimeter fence so his team can sneak through, then send a false order for a train to stop at his location. I’m not sure how his transmission is heard since he just destroyed the nearby radio post, but I digress.

Like the last one, most of this mission isn’t based in history, so I had to find something specific to focus on: trains.

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HTG’s Year In Review: 2014

•January 2, 2015 • Leave a Comment

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It’s 2015 and people are making grand plans for the upcoming year, but before I share any goals, I’d like to take a look back at History Through Gaming’s 2014.

On July 7, I posted “Getting the (St.) Lo-down on the King Tiger,” my first post in more than two years (and a headline that I’m still far too proud of), and made a commitment to keep the blog up and running. I ended up publishing 28 posts (including blog updates) over the rest of the year, passing the 50-post milestone with “The 20 mm FlaK and the Flakvierling” on Dec. 1.

I’m still amazed I got more than 50 posts out of Medal of Honor: Allied Assault, and now that I’m nearly finished with the game, I’m looking forward to diving into the next game. If all goes as planned, I should hit 100 posts sometime next year.

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Destroying Fort Schmerzen: The Communications Blackout

•December 29, 2014 • 1 Comment

Mission Photo Album

The German communications post Lt. Mike Powell must destroy on his way to Fort Schmerzen.

The German communications post Lt. Mike Powell must destroy on his way to Fort Schmerzen.

Even though he’s escaped the StG 44 production facility, Lt. Mike Powell isn’t out of the woods yet, literally or figuratively.

He’s still making his way through the forest along the Siegfried Line towards the fictional Fort Schmerzen, but he’s got a few more stops to make before rendezvousing with his squad to make the final assault.

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Blog Updates: Dec. 19, 2014

•December 19, 2014 • Leave a Comment

 

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Good evening!

If you haven’t seen this week’s post about the bombing of Germany’s Ruhr Valley, follow this link to check it out.

As usual, I’ve added a mission photo album and the following photos to their specific galleries:

That’s it for this week, but make sure to come back Monday as I get closer to finishing Medal of Honor: Allied Assault!

Bombing the Ruhr Valley: “The Smithy of the German Reich”

•December 15, 2014 • 1 Comment

Mission Photo Album

The "secret assembly plant" Powell finds along the Siegfried Line.

The “secret assembly plant” Powell finds along the Siegfried Line.

As Lt. Mike Powell heads towards the fictional Fort Schmerzen, he’s asked to infiltrate a “secret assembly plant and weapons stockpile” inside a Siegfried Line fortification and disrupt the production and resupply of the StG 44.

Col. Stanley Hargrove tells Powell that Allied bombing of the Ruhr Valley has hurt the German military, but that production of certain weapons had been moved to unknown locations. Now that Powell has found one, he needs to sneak in, steal some blueprints and the latest version of the assault rifle, then blow up the rest and escape to continue his main mission.

While the Ruhr Valley was certainly the most important industrial center in Germany during World War II, it was not the center of production for the StG 44, and even if the factories building the weapon had been bombed, it wouldn’t have made sense to move production to the Siegfried Line.

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